Minute Maid orange juice can, carved and painted wood, and turned iron. Smithsonian American Art Museum Gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. and museum purchase made possible by Ralph Cross Johnson.

This figure is similar to Southern minstrel dancing dolls, or “limberjacks,” which were loosely jointed and attached to a stick. Owners of these dolls placed them on a thin board, which they tapped with their fingers to make the figures dance. An unknown artist made this doll from found objects, perhaps to resemble the singer Bing Crosby. (American Folk Art: The Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. Collection, 1981)

Minute Maid orange juice can, carved and painted wood, and turned iron. Smithsonian American Art Museum Gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. and museum purchase made possible by Ralph Cross Johnson.

This figure is similar to Southern minstrel dancing dolls, or “limberjacks,” which were loosely jointed and attached to a stick. Owners of these dolls placed them on a thin board, which they tapped with their fingers to make the figures dance. An unknown artist made this doll from found objects, perhaps to resemble the singer Bing Crosby. (American Folk Art: The Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. Collection, 1981)

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